Manuel Madrid

Manuel Madrid is a writing fellow at The American Prospect

Recent Articles

Amazon Warehouses May Leave Cities Worse For Wear

A new report finds that localities with Amazon warehouses haven’t seen an overall boost in employment.

AP Photo/Patrick Semansky Myrtice Harris packages products for shipment at an Amazon fulfillment center in Baltimore. trickle-downers_35.jpg T he battle between cities to host Amazon’s second headquarters continues to dominate headlines, but the new HQ remains only the latest and largest prize in the tech giant’s long history of masterfully soliciting public subsidies. In Amazon’s quest to control same-day delivery, its network of almost 100 fulfillment centers—where products are sorted, packaged, and shipped—has now spread across 25 states. Lured by the prospect of hundreds or even thousands of new full-time warehouse jobs with competitive pay and benefits, local government officials crawl over each other to land the world’s largest online retailer in their backyard. But according to a new report by the Economic Policy Institute (EPI), many of these policymakers might really be selling their constituents short. The report found that, on average, counties that are home to Amazon...

Jeff Sessions Is Just Getting Started on Deporting More Immigrants

He’s speeding up their hearings, and if that leads to expelling exemplary immigrants on whose paperwork the government is sitting—well, that’s tough.

AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster
AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks during a news conference at the Justice Department T his could be Jeff Sessions’s year. Not that he wasn’t busy in 2017, a year marked by his rescinding Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), attacking sanctuary cities, reinstating debtors’ prisons, and cracking down on recreational marijuana. Indeed, over these last few months Sessions appears to have been working with the single-minded focus of a man who reportedly came within inches of losing his job in July after falling into President Trump’s bad graces for recusing himself from the Mueller probe. But 2018 will provide him his best chance yet at Trumpian redemption. Sessions has long railed against the United States’ “broken” asylum system and the massive backlog of immigration court cases, which has forced immigrants to suffer unprecedented wait times and has put a significant strain on court resources. But the attorney general’s appetite for reform has now...

What Republicans Have Learned from Their Tax Cut Debacles: Nothing

Despite the failures of trickle-down economics in Kansas and Oklahoma, Nebraska seems poised to give it a go.

AP Photo/Nati Harnik
AP Photo/Nati Harnik Nebraska Governor Pete Ricketts delivers his annual State of the State address to lawmakers in Lincoln trickle-downers_35.jpg L ess than two weeks into the new legislative session, Nebraska lawmakers already look to be moving full speed ahead on enacting corporate and top-rate tax cuts—even amid an ongoing budget shortfall that has resulted in severe spending cuts to state services. During his State of the State address on Wednesday, Nebraska Governor Pete Ricketts introduced the preliminary framework for a tax plan that would see the state’s top corporate and income tax rate cut twice over the next two years. The address marked what will be a second attempt by the governor at passing a tax reform bill after a plan he sponsored fell six votes short of passing the state’s Republican majority unicameral legislature last year, thanks to opposition from Democrats and some moderate Republicans. This bipartisan group of dissenters felt the bill didn’t do enough for...

The Other Imperiled Immigrants

For no good reason, other than spite and symbolism, Trump goes after Central American immigrants with Temporary Protected Status.

AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster
AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster A woman holds up a sign that reads "Defend DACA Defend TPS" during a rally supporting DACA outside the White House This article appears in the Winter 2018 issue of The American Prospect magazine. Subscribe here . UPDATE: On Monday, January 8, the Trump administration announced its decision to terminate special deportation protections for some 200,000 Salvadoran nationals. Immigrants from El Salvador were granted Temporary Protected Status after the country was struck by a series of deadly earthquakes in 2001. Salvadoran TPS holders have until September 2019 to change their immigration status, leave the United States, or risk going undocumented. T he past has come to claim Karla Alvarado and her family. Departing from Central America’s infamous Northern Triangle of El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras, Karla and her younger brother Carlos made the harrowing journey to the United States border in 1997, crossing over with the help of a coyote and then waiting for...

Booze, Women, and Movies: Chuck Grassley Couldn’t Be More Wrong about Taxpayers

Grassley’s characterizations of ordinary Americans are not only callous, but also patently false.

AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite
AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley speaks with reporters on Capitol Hill trickle-downers_35.jpg I f the Senate Republican tax bill could talk, it would probably sound a lot like Chuck Grassley. During a week already rife with Republican skullduggery, the Iowa Senator did his best Scrooge impression while defending the recently passed legislation’s weakening of the estate tax: “I think not having the estate tax recognizes the people that are investing,” Grassley told reporters last week . “As opposed to those that are just spending every darn penny they have, whether it’s on booze or women or movies.” The senator’s words were callous, elitist, and, worse still, completely inaccurate. In 2015, consumers with pre-tax incomes between $15,000 and $30,000 spent nearly eight-and-a-half times less on alcohol than consumers who made $200,000 or more, according to a Bureau of Labor Statistics survey . Consumers that made between $50,000 and $70,000...

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