Sherry Linkon

Sherry Linkon is a professor of English at Georgetown University and a faculty affiliate of the Kalmanovitz Initiative for Labor and the Working Poor. Her book, The Half-Life of Deindustrialization: Working-Class Writing about Economic Restructuring, will be published by the University of Michigan Press in 2018. She is the editor of Working-Class Perspectives.

Recent Articles

'Detroit' and Charlottesville

Fifty years may separate the riots in the two cities, but the root causes and the remedies remain the same

(Shaban Athuman /Richmond Times-Dispatch via AP)
(Shaban Athuman /Richmond Times-Dispatch via AP) Counter-protesters tear a Confederate flag during a white nationalist rally on August 12 in Charlottesville, Virginia. M y husband and I recently saw Kathryn Bigelow’s film Detroit. Set amid the 1967 uprising 50 years ago this summer, the film focuses primarily on the brutal torture and murder of three black men by police officers that took place that week at the Algiers Motel. Because it so powerfully and intimately dramatizes the racial hatred and injustice that has defined far too much of this country’s history, the film offers a thought-provoking counterpoint to what happened in Charlottesville. In an era when police officers keep shooting young black men whom they see as threatening, and when jury after jury acquits those officers, no matter how clear the evidence that their victims posed no threat at all, Bigelow puts us inside a sustained and horrific example of police brutality and, true to history, refuses us the relief of a...